“The EcoMap: Determining Your Zip Code’s Carbon Footprint” by Jared Blumenfeld

This presentation is brought to you by Arizona State University’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, and a generous investment by Julie Ann Wrigley. So the EcoMap came out of a partnership with Cisco, the computer manufacturer, and it talked about– the intro, I’m just going to talk through. You can read it. The goal was to be able to use ZIP codes to determine CO2 footprints in San Francisco. So the idea was, individuals want to make a difference, but they don’t really know what that difference would be. If you fill out a carbon calculator or do a pledge on the internet, it doesn’t really lead to any aggregated number. And so the point here was to be able to replicate what we do so that you can one day compare a Phoenix ZIP code with a San Francisco ZIP code with a Beijing ZIP code.

And this is– wait one second. So this is what you see. And the website’s launching in a few days. So you see San Francisco. You get a sense of all the ZIP codes. On the top, it tells you your ZIP code because you can now automatically– your IP address on your computer can be tabulated with your ZIP code. So rather than you having to type anything in, the computer tells you your ZIP code. And then it shows you the ZIP codes based on greenness. So the lighter the green, the better actual green you  are. So the first thing it shows you here, which is kind of maybe hard to read from where you’re sitting, but it shows you the three indicators, which are transportation, energy, and waste. And then it ranks the top 10 ZIP codes in San Francisco, and it shows you the percentage for each category. So in the first one, 50% is from transportation, 46% is from energy, and only 4% is from waste. So on energy, it shows you the amount of electricity used and the amount of gas.

So we went to our utility and said, we want, by ZIP code, the residential data for both gas and electricity, and then we looked at the amount of carbon in gas and the gas-electricity ratio, and came up with a ZIP code ranking. And you can see the little green or red arrows next to the number. So each month, there’s kind of the potential to go up or down. So in your community, if you get 30 or 40 people to do small actions, you can get your whole ZIP code to go from number two, let’s say, to number one. The other thing that it shows you on the bottom, that green bar, is the city average and the city goal. So we have these goals, but they’re very hard to translate so that people understand what they are. So the purpose here is to be able to show people, you know what? You’re not quite where the city goal is. If you took these actions, you could get there. So waste. It shows you the weight of the black cart, the weight of the green cart, so this is average per household weight– and the blue cart. And you can see huge disparities between the top ZIP code with 295 pounds, and the worst in this one is 925.

So three times more is being thrown away in one ZIP code than another. And it turns out that the ZIP code that’s doing really well is called South Beach. It’s a new development. It’s young people that live in small apartments. They’re producing three times less trash than single-family homes in the Richmond. But really, I mean, it’s startling starting to look at that data, and who’s throwing away more green material, and who’s throwing away more refuse. Transportation. We managed to get the state data and regional data so that you can start looking at the number of hybrids, the number of SUVs, and then the miles per year driven to commute in each ZIP code, which gives you your carbon footprint. So really starting to get pretty high-level granularity of data to look at this issue. You can do it by ZIP code, you can start comparing two ZIP codes, and eventually, you’ll be able to take two ZIP codes from different places on the planet and compare SUV versus hybrid ownership, for instance. So the next thing we did is look at these three key indicators, which are effort, cost, and impact.

So that’s what we learned from our market research was that those are the three drivers. People want to look at the effort they need to take to do something, the cost it’s going to be to do that thing, and then, what is the impact? So there’s some things that are very high impact, but they’re also very high effort, like going car-free. If you said, I’m going to give up my car and just walk, bike, and take public transit, it’s a huge impact, but it’s also quite a lot of effort. Putting solar panels is not a huge effort, really, but it’s a huge cost. And so some people may not be willing to do that, or able to do that. And so we tailored, rather than just coming up with generic things that you could do, based on what your personal profile is by effort, cost, and impact, we then generate a list for you of what you can do.

So it comes up with a list, and then you get to decide out of those which actual actions you want to take in the three different categories. And as you take them, it fills out your tree. And as it fills out your tree, you can then add it to Facebook. We really wanted to add the social networking dimension, and we used the mayor here, so you get to see the mayor’s Facebook page. And his tree goes on there. And then it goes back and looks at the people that live around the mayor that are also using the site through Facebook and finds out what they’re doing. So he decides he wants a plan a bicycle route. So it doesn’t just give you a high level of data. It starts to mine down deeper. So it says he’s going to go from City Hall to see the Giants, and then it shows the route. And one of the cool things that we did with the route planner is that it also shows you the gradient, you can see on the bottom right. San Francisco, we have a lot of hills. People want to know, if there’s an easy route, how long does it take? And then at the bottom, it links you to a bike buddy through Facebook.

So if you don’t want to bicycle alone, you’re just starting to bike, it helps you do that. And then it links you to other people. This person can teach you how to learn how to compost. The next person is going to be part of a green business, and they happen to have a video on Cole Hardware, which is a small hardware store that can tell you more about what you want to know about green businesses. So you can really start linking this to real-life experiences in the city rather than making it some abstract tool that is of little use. So this will launch in Seoul. We started in San Francisco. Amsterdam and Seoul are the next two cities that are going to do it. And then the goal is to replicate the model by greening each ZIP code. And ZIP codes really are a scale that you can start measuring things. I mean, if you get enough ZIP codes to do it, you can really see what the impact on the planet is going to be. This presentation is brought to you by Arizona State University’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, for educational, and non-commercial use only.

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“Preparing to Adapt: Climate Change as a Market Shift” by Andy Hoffman

This presentation is brought to you by Arizona State University’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, and a generous investment by Julie Ann Wrigley. And as a business executive, you really want to think about climate change as a market shift. You can be completely agnostic about the science of climate change and still see the business implications for how it will change the market for your goods and services as you go out there. In any market shift, there are winners and losers. And companies right now need to be thinking about, what is the form of this market shift? And what does it mean for your competitive position vis-a-vis other companies in your sector? I put this up here. And a lot of my students don’t know what this device is in the bottom left here. [LAUGHING] But they do know what this device is over here in the bottom right.

And I asked them, have you ever heard of Olivetti, or Smith Corona, or IBM? And they all perk up. Yes, I know IBM. Well, these were three of the biggest typewriter manufacturers until the market shift. And only one of them made the transition– IBM. Smith Corona and Olivetti are gone. Are we talking about that big a market shift in climate change? As the price gets set for carbon, as investor and consumer markets start to shift, what will this do to the market that you’re in? That’s the way company executives really need to think about this. Leave the science aside. Debate the science if you wish, but the real question is, what does it do to your competitive position? That’s really the way that you need to think about it. Now some companies have developed capacities to watch the science. Swiss Re has climatologists on staff. They’re looking at this issue as an important implication for their investment portfolio and their insurance instruments. And they feel that getting ahead on this– DuPont as well. DuPont is looking at this and said, we’ve seen this one before.

It was called CFCs. It was called ozone depletion. It wiped out a market for one of our products and we need to innovate to get ahead of it. So watching the science is not necessarily a bad strategy. Believing in the science is not a bad strategy. But recognizing the market implications is where you need to be when you think about this as a business issue. Now, when you think about it as a market shift, there are two questions that emerge. And I hear them a lot. And I want to go through them and why they’re the wrong ones. The first one– how much will it cost? This will cost money. Estimates from McKinsey, from the Stern Report, from others, put the number somewhere around 1% of GDP. Now first of all, that’s an interesting number because we can’t measure global GDP within 1% anyway. But it is real numbers.

This is real money. But again, the question is, how much does it cost you? How does it affect your competitive positioning? How does it affect the other companies in your sector? There’s an expression– the cost you face the most in business is the one you have to incur and your competitor does not. And that’s what you need to be looking at in this. Are you a utility that’s very invested in coal? In nuclear? In natural gas? How is this going to change your positioning in the market. These are the kinds of important questions you need to ask, not just the absolute– how much will it cost? The second question– does it pay to be green? This is a question that– it drives me nuts. It’s a nonsensical question. It’s the exact same thing as asking does it pay to innovate. And it’s not a yes or no question. It depends on who does it, when they do it, how they do it. In the face of a market shift on climate change, you have to innovate. How are you going to innovate? When are you going to innovate? Are you the best one to innovate into this new space? These are the kind of questions you want to ask. So move away from this, does it pay to be green– the question makes no sense.

And really start to think about this in brass tacks as a business issue. This presentation is brought to you by Arizona State University’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, for educational, and non-commercial use only..

The Price of Carbon

Your wallet. Your bank account. You keep a close eye on them. You pay for your groceries. You pay for your car. You pay for your stuff. You pay for your roads, your schools — the things we all share. You know what else you’re paying for? Carbon pollution. Oh yes, you’re paying for carbon. Science tells us carbon pollution is the leading cause of climate disruption. The burning of dirty energy is raising our planets temperature which makes extreme and erratic weather more likely. The result? You’ve been living in it. “2012 was the hottest year in the United States since weather scientists started keeping record.” And half of all U.S. counties were declared disaster zones due to last summer’s crippling drought.

And because of the drought, wildfires scorched one and a half times more land than usual. On the East coast, crazy storms have led to a record-breaking flooding. We’ve always had extreme weather, but now thanks to carbon pollution, we have weather on steroids. And we’re paying for it. Congress has agreed on more than fifty billion dollars in relief for the victims of super storm Sandy. The costliest global disasters of 2012 were hurricane Sandy — Cost: $65 billion — And the yearlong Midwest planes drought that cost us $35 billion. Drought relief, disaster relief, battling wildfires, building seawalls — All these expenses add up. And that’s the price of carbon. But Big Oil isn’t paying. And Big Coal isn’t paying. They are using the atmosphere as an open sewer while you are paying the tab through taxes, medical bills, higher food, prices, insurance rates, and more. But no wallet in the world is big enough. It’s time to take action.

It’s time to tell the world: We are paying the price OF carbon. It’s time to put a price ON carbon. And make the polluters stop the carbon destruction. Tell your friends. Tell our leaders. It’s time to have the carbon conversation. (I think that’s everything).